ONLINE SPEAKER EVENT: Dr. Elaine Sullivan (M.A. and Ph.D. in Egyptian Art and Archaeology at Johns Hopkins University) on “Constructing the Sacred: Exploring the Ritual Landscape of Saqqara in 3D.”

Join SCAS for a presentation by Dr. Elaine Sullivan on “Constructing the Sacred: Exploring the Ritual Landscape of Saqqara in 3D.” DATE: Thursday, October 13, 2022 TIME: 7:00 – 8:00 PM (Pacific) ** RSVP by 6:00 PM on Thursday, October … Continue reading

A 10,000+/- year-old history story to be told – And we need your help!

The Santa Cruz Archaeological Society is taking on leadership for bringing an important piece of the prehistory of Scotts Valley to life by updating and expanding the archaeological display in the City Hall. And we need donations. Some of you … Continue reading

SCAS Speaker Series on Youtube: A Collection of Recorded SCAS Guest Speaker Events

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdZkxtvgQglgqhRNHdjB65w/playlists

Linda Yamane’s Basket Transformed into a Striking Mosaic Mural in East Oakland Honoring the First Nation Ohlone

January 2021 article by Frances Phillips from the Creative Work Fund: https://creativeworkfund.org/news/linda-yamanes-basket-transformed-into-a-striking-mosaic-mural From artist Jess Medina’s Facebook Page: https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10218784190543884&id=1474039349&sfnsn=mo

Wikipedia Santa Cruz Archaeology Updates: the Scotts Valley Site (CA-SCR-177), the Redman-Hirahara Farmstead, the Lost Adobe and Phoenix Buttons in California

Rob Edwards’ recent Wikipedia online encyclopedia updates include: the Scotts Valley site (CA-SCR-177),  Redman-Hirahara Farmstead, the Lost Adobe and an entry on Phoenix Buttons in California. Excavations of the Scotts Valley site (CA-SCR-177), Lost Adobe and the Redman-Hirahara Farmstead were … Continue reading

What Does the Santa Cruz Archaeological Society Do and What Have We Done?

The Santa Cruz Archaeological Society (SCAS) was started in 1972 and has been continuously active for over 44 years. In its first two years the Society grew to over 50 members, almost all who had had at least one class in Introductory Archaeology from Cabrillo College and many had had a Field Class experience as well. They came with a fascination for archaeology and with deep ties to our community. The impact of these “community archaeologists” over the years has been extensive. Continue reading